Lynn Anderson on the Value of Mentors

Each Monday, I have been posting segments of an interview with Lynn Anderson of San Antonio, Texas.  Lynn has served as church planter, minister, and mentor to many, many people.  In this segment, he discusses the value of mentors in his life.  I, along with a number of other people, have been blessed through Lynn’s mentoring.  Watch this video and enjoy.  I would love to hear your feedback on his comments.

(You might enjoy visiting Lynn’s website, Mentornetwork.org.  I encourage you to to visit it if you have not.)

 

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  • http://www.thejerichoroad.com Jan

    Very good, Jim, and much appreciated. I could not agree more with Lynn’s comments. I returned to University studies as a "mature" student in 1998 and continued until 2003. Some mentoring relationships developed there, both for me and by me, continue today. Apart from my formal studies off and on since 1975, the mentors God has brought into my life, some professors of theology and other very "ordinary" people, have been my most profound friends and educators. I still have so much to learn and unlearn. I was recently introduced to a book I’m sure your already familiar with, "The Critical Journey", by Janet O. Hagberg. In exploring the life of faith in the form of a six stage model, she unveils some important principles of mentoring. Thought I’d pass that on for those who might be interested.

  • http://www.passforward.org Arlan Berglas

    Lynn Anderson is truly an inspiration to hundreds of thousands of people and that is why we have highlighted the Mentor Network on the Pass It Forward Movement’s website.  Please take a look at http://www.aunitedworld.org/lynn.asp and give us your feedback. 

  • http://cliffbarbarick.blogspot.com Cliff Barbarick

    I think Lynn implicitly touched on one of the most important characteristics of a mentor: humility.  In our recent study on some spiritual disciplines at Robinson, I have noticed how each week I find myself emphasizing the importance of humility for all of the practices.  Otherwise, they can easily slip into legalism or elitism or condescension.  Mentoring is certainly not an exception.  Here’s how I ended a recent Bible class on the subject of mentoring (in which I focused on the relationship between Barnabas and Paul):One last point about mentoring: As a mentor, you should long for your student to surpass you one day.  Mentoring should not be an “ego trip” that inflates your sense of self-importance.  You cannot feel threatened by the success of your student and be a good mentor.  Mentoring is an act of humility in which you recognize gifts in another that you want to help develop in order that he may surpass what you have accomplished.  Barnabas is again an excellent example.  At the beginning of their ministry together, the pair is always called “Barnabas and Saul,” clearly placing Barnabas in the position of importance.  He leads the team.  A transition takes place in Acts 13:9, however, and it corresponds with the alteration of Saul’s name.  Saul, filled with the Holy Spirit, boldly confronts a Roman official and blinds him.  The proconsul is convicted by the powerful demonstration, and the ministry team is never the same.  What was once always “Barnabas and Saul” becomes in 13:13, “Paul and his companions.”  Barnabas isn’t even named!  Thereafter, with only a couple of explainable exceptions (14:14; 15:12, 25), the ministry team is always called “Paul and Barnabas.”  Paul has gone from being the student to the “chief speaker” (14:12), but their ministry continues to flourish.  Barnabas must have been an exceptional man.  How many preachers do you know who would stick around after being supplanted by a young up-and-comer?  Probably only those that embraced the green preacher as a mentor and hoped and prayed that “he must become greater; I must become less” (John 3:30). Cliff

  • Jim Martin

    Jan,So glad to hear of your positive, formative experiences with some of your mentors.  Thanks for passing this on.  You are right, these people can be invaluable. I am not familiar with the book that you mentioned but appreciate you passing this on.  I will have to look for it.

  • Jim Martin

    Arlan,Thanks very much.  The link on your website is very nice.  I am grateful for your exposing your readers to someone who has encouraged and mentored so many.

  • Jim Martin

    Cliff,What an outstanding comment!  I love your entire paragraph.  In particular, I was encouraged and convicted by these words: "One last point about mentoring: As a mentor, you should long for your
    student to surpass you one day.  Mentoring should not be an “ego trip”
    that inflates your sense of self-importance.  You cannot feel
    threatened by the success of your student and be a good mentor.  Mentoring
    is an act of humility in which you recognize gifts in another that you
    want to help develop in order that he may surpass what you have
    accomplished."
    Thanks so very much.